Carceral Cultures publishes a new article on tourism at Kingston Pen

Carceral Cultures Research Initiative team members Justin Piché (Associate Professor, Criminology, uOttawa), Matthew Ferguson (PhD Student, Criminology, uOttawa) and Kevin Walby (Associate Professor, Criminal Justice, uWinnipeg) have published a new article in Volume 8 of the Annual Review of Interdisciplinary Justice Research. Entitled “A ‘win-win for everyone’ Except Prisoners: Kingston Penitentiary Tours as a Staff, Media and Public Relations Campaign”, the paper explores how Correctional Service Canada (CSC) planned tours of the notorious penitentiary as a means of neutralize criticism concerning its closure. The paper is the second open access publication produced by the Carceral Cultures team that contains hyperlinks to internal documents obtained from CSC using Access to Information requests that allows readers to consult materials that substantiate the authors’ claims and to use for their own research purposes (also see Shook et al., 2017). Building off of these, as well as other previous publications in Scapegoat: Architecture / Landscape / Political Economy (Ferguson et al., 2014) and Theoretical Criminology (Kleuskens et al., 2016), the research team continues to conduct research on CSC’s involvement in punishment memorialization work that legitimates the deprivation of liberty in the Canadian carceral state.

In related news, doctoral student Matthew Ferguson successfully defended his comprehensive exam today entitled “Policing Memories and Memorialization in the Carceral State”. His research is helping to push the Carceral Cultures Research Initiative’s work on punishment memorialization beyond the confines of incarceration to examine the memory work concerning other penal system entities such as the public policeclick here to learn more). Congratulations Matthew!

Photograph by Justin Piché (2013) at Kingston Penitentiary following its closure.

Photograph by Justin Piché (2013) at Kingston Penitentiary following its closure.