Contemporary Justice Review publishes an article on Canadian carceral expansion marketing by Justin Piché and MA program graduate Shanisse Kleuskens

Justin Piché (Associate Professor, Criminology, uOttawa), Shanisse Kleuskens (MA program graduate, Criminology, uOttawa) and Kevin Walby (Associate Professor, Criminal Justice, uWinnipeg) have authored an article entitled "The Front and Back Stages of Canadian Carceral Expansion Marketing" in the newest issue of Contemporary Justice Review.  Consult the abstract below to learn more about the study.

Aerial photo of the New Edmonton Remand Centre, Canada's largest jail

Aerial photo of the New Edmonton Remand Centre, Canada's largest jail

Abstract: This article examines how provincial and territorial government agencies and prison authorities in Canada promote new penal infrastructure initiatives. Through an analysis of press releases, websites, opening ceremonies and open houses to promote jail and prison construction projects, our analysis reveals discourses legitimating carceral expansion in the Canadian context including: the pursuit of public safety and institutional security; providing opportunities for rehabilitation and healing; addressing the legacies of colonization through the 'indigenizing' of imprisonment; generating economic stimulus through prison-related employment and other financial contributions; and the establishment of 'environmentally-friendly' prisons. Drawing from government records obtained using Access to Information and Freedom of Information requests, we also provide examples of how front stage messages communicated to the public are assembled by bureaucrats and marketing firms in the back stage of these  punishment campaigns.