Carceral Cultures Research Initiative members publish three new papers

Members of the Carceral Cultures Research Initiative, which aims to generate knowledge about Canada's culture of punishment that informs and gives meaning to penal policies and practices, have recently published three new peer-reviewed papers about the meaning making process in lock-up, jail, prison, and penitentiary museums. Click on the publications listed below to learn more about the study led by Justin Piché (Associate Professor, Criminology, uOttawa) and Kevin Walby (Associate Professor, Criminal Justice, uWinnipeg) exploring meanings of confinement and punishment in Canadian penal history sites.

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New Publications - Carceral Cultures Research Initiative:

Ferguson, Matthew, Devon Madill, Justin Piché and Kevin Walby. (2018). ‘Everybody likes escape stories’: Exploring Representations of Prison Escape in Canadian Penal History Museums.  In Tomas Max Martin and Gilles Chantraine (eds), Prison Breaks: Toward a Sociology of Prison Escape, London: Palgrave (pp. 311-335).

Luscombe, Alex, Kevin Walby and Justin Piché. (2018). Making Punishment Memorialization Pay? Marketing, Networks and Souvenirs at Small Penal History Museums. Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Research, 42(3): 343-364. 

Walby, Kevin, Justin Piché and Brittany Friesen. (2018). ‘they didn’t just do it because it was a job’: Representing Wardens in Canadian Penal History Museums. International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice, Online First, 8 pages. 

Featuring our post-doctoral researchers: Dr. Sachil Singh

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Dr. Sachil Singh is a post-doctoral research fellow in our department working on the SSHRC-funded Big Data Surveillance Project with Professor Valerie Steeves. Sachil is extending his research interests on social classification and social (dis)advantage to examine how ‘big data’ shapes the definitions and operationalization of race/ethnicity in the searchable digital tools, known as Point of Care (PoC) tools, that are used by healthcare practitioners for patient diagnosis. PoC tools are digital resources that are typically used by physicians, nurse practitioners, and other healthcare practitioners, at workstations and on smart phones, in order to effectively and efficiently find relevant information about medical conditions and medications, often during consultations with patients. 

The study is divided into two main parts.  The first part provides a content analysis of PoC tools to investigate causations and correlations between race/ethnicity and medical ailments.  The second part is an empirical contribution that draws on healthcare practitioners' experiences with, and perceptions of, PoC tools in three Ontario locations in order to investigate the extent to which uses of PoC tools inform patient diagnosis.   

Soirée Trivia de l'AÉDC / CGSA Trivia Night

L'AÉDC invite les étudiants et les professeurs à une soirée "trivia" qui se tiendra au Café Nostalgica. La nourriture et les breuvages seront fournis. 

Nous espérons vous voir en grand nombre!

Cette soirée "trivia" est pour les étudiants et les professeurs et se déroulera au café Nostalgica le 13 février 2018 à 16h30 dans le but d'avoir du plaisir avec votre cohorte.

The CGSA would like to invite students and faculty to a trivia night at Café Nostalgica. Food and drinks will be provided.

Hope to see you there!

This trivia night is for students and teachers and will take place at Nostalgica Café on February 13, 2018 at 4:30 pm in order to have fun with your cohort.

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Journée d'écriture CRM 1er mars / CRM writing day March 1st

Bonjour chères-chers doctorantes et doctorants et chères-chers étudiantes et étudiants à la maîtrise en criminologie.

La date de la prochaine journée d’écriture est : 

Jeudi, 1er mars 2018
De 9h à 16h
Pavillon Alex Trebek, salle Canada Vie
157 Séraphin Marion

Nous vous demandons de prévoir tout ce dont vous avez besoin (portable, livres et documents et lunch) afin d’éviter de quitter durant la journée d’écriture. 

*SVP, amenez votre propre tasse*

Au plaisir de partager ce temps d’écriture avec vous!

Michèle Diotte et Véronique Strimelle

Dear doctoral students and dear students at the master's degree in criminology.

Date of the next day of writing is:

Thursday, March 1st, 2018
From 9am to 4pm
Pavilion Alex Trebek, Canada Life Room
157 Séraphin Marion

We ask you to plan everything you need (laptop, books and lunch) to avoid leaving during the writing day.

* Please bring your own mug *

Looking forward to sharing this writing time with you!

Michèle Diotte and Véronique Strimelle

Featuring our post-doctoral researchers: Dr. Wahida Chowdhury

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Dr. Wahida Chowdhury is a cognitive scientist with a background in cognitive science and psychology. Since September 2017, she is a postdoctoral fellow in our department, working with Dr. Valerie Steeves. The title of their research, funded by The eQuality Project, a SSHRC-funded partnership, is “Canadian Kids Online: Using Surveys to Map Children’s Experiences on the Internet”. The project contributes to a global comparative analysis of children’s’ online experiences. As more and more children are using the Internet not only nationally but also to engage internationally, comparative research is needed to develop evidence-based policies and international standards that make the Internet a safer and positive place for children. The team developed an online survey to explore Canadian children’s access to the Internet, online opportunities and risks, knowledge of and concerns with online privacy, online skills (including digital literacy and privacy-protective strategies), and social support when dealing with online challenges.

The first part of the project adopted questions from the Global Kids Online survey, which is developed collaboratively by UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti, the London School of Economics and Political Science, and the EU Kids Online network as part of the Global Kids Online Project (GKO). The objective of the first part is to advance our understanding of how networked environments amplify risks and opportunities to children. The second part of the project is developed by the team based on previous research investigating concerns about online privacy, including some questions used by MediaSmart’s Young Canadians in the Wired World research project. The objective of this part is to investigate how sensitivities to privacy relate to online risks and harms by correlating the answers to the privacy questionnaire with other questions of the survey.

Featuring our post-doctoral researchers: Dr. Ciara Bracken-Roche

Dr. Ciara Bracken-Roche is a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow in our department since January 2018 under the supervision of Dr. Valerie Steeves. Her project is entitled: “Drones and big data: Governance techniques and their implications for policing in contemporary Canadian society”.  This project explores the adoption and use of drone technologies in Canada with a specific focus on policing and urban spaces. It also explores how these technologies fit within emerging governance techniques designed to use big data to enhance control. The project will create new knowledge about the relationship between police use of these technologies/techniques of governance and existing legal, social and technological norms in Canadian society. Building on her PhD work, this post-doctoral project seeks to examine how, in a big data environment, mobile and multifaceted technologies such as drones risk the further reinforcement of traditional hierarchies of governance; they digitize space and turn the lived environment into a persistent form of data collection. It will do this through a specific exploration of the role of UAS in policing and urban control in Canada, with a particular focus on how UAS contribute to big data governance within Canada.

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uOttawa CRM student Jarrod Shook discusses the fight to improve federal prisoners' pay in Canada

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uOttawa criminology student and Journal of Prisoners on Prisons (JPP) editorial staff member Jarrod Shook discussed the future of the fight to improve the pay of federal prisoners for their labour in light of a recent court decision allowing the current regime to remain in force this afternoon on All in a Day with Alan Neal on CBC Radio Ottawa and in an op-ed published in the Ottawa Citizen. Prison pay was also a central theme in a recent issue of the JPP he co-edited, which you can read by clicking here.

Graduate Research Dissemination Workshop / Atelier sur la dissémination de la recherche pour les étudiant(e)s diplômé(e)s

Wednesday, February 7, 2018
11:30am - 1:00pm
FSS 4004

LEARN ABOUT:


Abstract Writing for Relevant Conferences and Symposiums + Graduate Student and Other Peer-reviewed Journals in Criminology and Related Fields
Justin Piché – Associate Professor

Conference Paper and Poster Presentations
Carolyn Côté-Lussier – Assistant Professor

Academic Paper Writing
Patrick Savoie – PhD Candidate

Media Interviews and Op-ed Writing
Michael Kempa – Chair

* Pizza and salad provided *

Please RSVP with justin.piche@uottawa.ca

Le mercredi 7 février 2018
11h30 - 13h00
FSS 4004


CONTENU ABORDÉ :

Écriture de résumés pour des conférences et symposiums pertinents + publications savantes et d’études supérieures en criminologie et disciplines connexes
Justin Piché – professeur agrégé

Présentations d’affiches et de manuscrits lors de conférences
Carolyn Côté-Lussier – professeur adjoint

Rédaction d’un article ou chapitre pour une publication académique
Patrick Savoie – candidat au doctorat

Entrevues avec les médias et rédaction d'articles d'opinion
Michael Kempa – directeur

* Pizza et salades servies *

SVP confirmez votre présence avec justin.piche@uottawa.ca

Carolyn Côté-Lussier publie une nouvelle étude / Carolyn Côté-Lussier publishes a new study

Une étude réalisée par Carolyn Côté-Lussier de l’Université d’Ottawa et Jason T. Carmichael de l’Université McGill démontre que l’inclination du public pour les politiques sévères en matière de justice pénale est davantage fondée sur les préoccupations morales que sur les affiliations politiques. Lisez une entrevue avec professeure Côté-Lussier ici (en anglais seulement).

Research by Carolyn Côté-Lussier from the University of Ottawa and Jason T. Carmichael from McGill University shows that public support for harsh criminal justice policy is better explained by moral concerns than political affiliation. Read an interview with professor Côté-Lussier here.

Opinion publique sur la réforme de la justice pénale : les préoccupations morales et non l’appartenance politique

Le Canada entreprend actuellement une révision des fondements de ses politiques de justice pénale, notamment en ce qui a trait aux pratiques controversées de l’isolement et des peines minimales obligatoires. Ces enjeux ont été ramenés au premier plan après de récents décès en isolement hautement médiatisés et d’importants délais dans les tribunaux canadiens. Chez nos voisins du sud, l’initiative de réforme du système étatsunien de justice pénale englobe entre autres des lois visant à faciliter la libération des personnes condamnées par erreur et l’amélioration des conditions carcérales pour les personnes atteintes de maladies mentales. Le cheminement de ces réformes repose entre autres sur l’atteinte d’un consensus politique.

Les travaux des deux chercheurs démontrent que si elles sont bien expliquées et objectivement évaluées comme étant équitables, les réformes pénales difficiles et initialement impopulaires auprès du public sont susceptibles d’être acceptées au fil du temps.

Moral concerns, not politics, guide public opinion on criminal justice reform

Canada is in the midst of revising the foundations of its criminal justice policies related to, among other things, the controversial practices of solitary confinement and mandatory minimum sentences. Recent high profile deaths in solitary confinement and significant court backlogs have brought these issues to the forefront at home. Abroad, the Criminal Justice Reform Initiative in the United States has focused in part on legislation to help free wrongfully convicted individuals and improving conditions for those with mental illness. Moving forward with such reforms depends in part on finding a political consensus.

Côté-Lussier and Carmichael’s research shows that difficult, and initially unpopular reforms that are explained and objectively assessed as being fair are likely to become accepted with time.

Un système de justice pénale qui coûte cher

On estime que les dépenses liées au système canadien de justice pénale se sont accrues de 66 % entre 2002 et 2012, passant de 13,4 à 20,3 milliards de dollars. Bien que le taux d’incarcération des adultes est demeuré relativement stable au cours des quelque 50 dernières années au Canada, le nombre de personnes qui attendent leur procès derrière les barreaux est monté en flèche – en 2016, ces personnes composaient plus de la moitié de la population carcérale au Canada

The costly criminal justice system

It is estimated that Canadian criminal justice system expenditures increased by 66 percent (from $13.4 billion to $20.3 billion) between 2002 and 2012. Although the Canadian adult incarceration rate has remained relatively stable over the past fifty or so years, there have been important increases in the number of people jailed while awaiting trial — in 2016, it grew to more than half of Canada’s prison population



 

Post-doc Ciara Bracken-Roche's research is featured in the National Post

Ciara Bracken-Roche, a new SSHRC postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Criminology, speaks to the National Post about a new anti-drone surveillance technology in a news story entitled "Could new technology keep drones from spying on you?

Here you can find the link to her upcoming talk as part of the SSC Seminar Series that will occur on Wednesday January 24 from 12:30pm to 2:00pm. She will present a paper entitled "Navigating Canadian drone space: a sociological analysis of the stakeholders, narratives, and policy shaping Canadian unmanned systems". 

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Nominate CRM Personnel for a Faculty Award / Recommandez la nomination d'un(e) membre du personnel en CRM pour un prix facultaire

Every year, the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Ottawa awards a series of prizes to recognize the achievements of its professors, researchers, administrative staff, and dedicated teaching assistants. Students, staff, along with professors can nominate exceptional CRM personnel that have made a difference in their academic work and/or the life of the Department of Criminology for the Faculty awards below by submitting a letter of recommendation to Michael Kempa, the Chair of the Department of Criminology, by Monday, February 19, 2018. The nominations will then be reviewed and the name of one candidate per prize will then be forwarded to the Faculty of Social Sciences for consideration.

Award for Service Excellence:  Granted to a member of the administrative staff to tangibly recognize the importance of quality service excellence in the student experience. The award recognizes the key role that employees play in positions geared toward service.

Administrative Staff Award: Granted to a member of the administrative staff that has contributed to the betterment of the Faculty and the unit in which he or she works, through his or her initiative, creativity and superior performance.
* Past CRM Winner: Joanne Cardinal (2007)

Teaching Assistants Awards: Awarded in recognition of exceptional work done by teaching assistants with students and professors during a semester-long course.
* Past CRM Winners: Laura Dunbar (2015) and Nicolas Olivier (2014)

Part-time Professor of the Year Award: Granted to a member of the APTPUO in recognition of their contribution to pedagogy, excellence in teaching and participation in university life.
Past CRM Winner: Kate Fletcher (2013)

Excellence in Teaching Award: Granted to a member of the teaching staff, nominated by his or her peers, who has demonstrated outstanding performance in his or her teaching, in particular in the development of innovative teaching material, courses, and programs of study, and for his or her interpersonal skills.
Past CRM Winners: Line Beauchesne (2011), Sylvie Frigon (2010), André Cellard (2007) and Alvaro Pires (2006)

Award for Activities in the Media or the Community: Presented annually to a member of the teaching staff who has demonstrated outstanding service by sharing his or her expertise through the media or with the community, both locally and nationally.
* Past CRM Winner: Michael Kempa (2016)

Young Researcher Award: Presented annually to a member of the teaching staff who has earned distinction for his or her unit and Faculty as a result of the importance and exceptional characteristics of his or her research work.
* Past CRM Winners: Justin Piché (2016) and Patrice Corriveau (2012)

Excellence in Research Award: Granted to a member of the teaching staff who has earned distinction for his or her unit and Faculty as a result of the importance and exceptional characteristics of his or her research work.

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Chaque année, la Faculté des sciences sociales de l'Université d'Ottawa décerne une série de prix pour souligner les réalisations de ses professeur.e.s, de ses chercheur.e.s, de son personnel administratif et de ses assistant.e.s d'enseignement dévoué.e.s. Les étudiant.e.s, le personnel et les professeur.e.s peuvent nommer un.e candidat.e exceptionnel.le qui a fait une différence par leur travail académique et / ou dans la vie du Département de criminologie pour les prix de la faculté ci-dessous en soumettant une lettre de recommandation à Michael Kempa, Directeur du Département, avant le lundi 19 février 2018. Les candidatures seront ensuite examinées et le nom d'un.e candidat.e par prix sera ensuite transmis à la Faculté des sciences sociales pour évaluation.

Prix pour l'excellence du service: Octroyé afin de reconnaître de façon tangible l'importance de la qualité du service et l'accueil pour l'expérience étudiante et pour valoriser l'importance du rôle que le personnel joue dans les postes axés fortement sur le service à la communauté facultaire.

Prix du personnel administratif de l'année: Octroyé à un membre du personnel administratif qui a contribué à l'essor de son unité et de la Faculté, grâce à son initiative, sa créativité et son rendement supérieur.
* Lauréat CRM: Joanne Cardinal (2007)

Prix assistants d'enseignements: Décerné en reconnaissance du travail exceptionnel accompli par des assistants d'enseignement avec des étudiants et des professeurs au cours d'un semestre.
* Lauréats CRM: Laura Dunbar (2015) et Nicolas Olivier (2014)

Prix d'excellence du professeur à temps-partiel: Octroyé afin de souligner l'apport des membres de l'Association des professeures et professeurs à temps partiel de l'Université d'Ottawa (APTPUO) à l'enseignement universitaire.
* Lauréat CRM: Kate Fletcher (2013)

Prix d'excellence en enseignement: Octroyé à un membre du corps professoral nommé par ses pairs pour reconnaître sa contribution à l'enseignement, notamment dans la conception et l'innovation de matériel pédagogique, la conception de cours, l'élaboration de programmes d'études et pour ses compétences interpersonnelles.
* Lauréats CRM: Line Beauchesne (2011), Sylvie Frigon (2010), André Cellard (2007) et Alvaro Pires (2006)

Prix pour les activités dans les médias ou dans la communauté: Octroyé aux membres du corps professoral qui ont partagé leurs connaissances et leurs compétences avec les médias et ou avec des organismes de la communauté à l'échelle locale et nationale.
* Lauréat CRM: Michael Kempa (2016)

Prix jeune chercheur ou chercheuse: Octroyé à un membre du corps professoral qui a contribué de façon exceptionnelle à l’essor de son unité et à la Faculté par l'importance et l’influence de ses contributions dans son domaine d’activités.
* Lauréats CRM: Justin Piché (2016) et Patrice Corriveau (2012)

Prix d'excellence en recherche: Octroyé à un membre du corps professoral qui a contribué de façon exceptionnelle à l’essor de son unité et à la Faculté par l'importance et l’influence de ses contributions dans son domaine d’activités.

Projet en Vedette: Police, Gouvernance et (In)sécurité / Featured Project: Policing, Governance and (In)security

Les dates limites pour postuler aux programmes de doctorat (10 janvier) et de maîtrise (15 janvier) offerts par le département de criminologie à l'Université d'Ottawa approchent rapidement. Dans le mois suivant, vous trouverez quelques-uns des nombreux exemples de projet de recherche conduits par les professeurs dans chacun de nos dix champs de recherche. L'édition d'aujourd'hui expose le projet de David Moffette dans le champ de recherche «Police, Gouvernance et (In)sécurité».

The application deadlines for the doctoral (January 10) and master’s programs (January 15) offered by the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa are rapidly approaching.  Over the next month you will find a few of the many examples of research projects being led by professors in each of our ten research fields. Today’s edition showcases a project by David Moffette within the research field of “Policing, Governance and (In)security”. 

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Policing, Governance and (In)security / Police, gouvernance et (in)sécurité

  • Contrôle municipal de l'immigration? Jeux de juridictions, pratiques nationalistes et « travail de frontières » À Montréal et Barcelone / Municipal immigration control? Overlapping jurisdictions, nationalist practices and municipal borderwork in Montreal and Barcelona (David Moffette)

Cette recherche comparative de David Moffette étudie les logiques et pratiques d’acteurs institutionnels impliqués dans le contrôle de l’immigration au niveau municipal à Montréal et Barcelone. Officiellement, le contrôle des frontières et de l’immigration n’est pas une compétence municipale, mais nous ne devons pas en conclure que des acteurs municipaux n’est impliqué dans le « travail de frontière ». Le projet de recherche : 1) documente l’application de règlements municipaux contre des immigrant(e)s à statuts précaires ; 2) s’intéresse à la façon dont des employé(e)s et élu(e)s municipaux négocient plus de pouvoir et ressources pour gérer l’immigration dans un contexte ou les gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux (pour le Québec) et central et autonomes (pour la Catalogne) se partage la majorité des compétences en la matière ; et 3) étudie si la gouvernance municipale de l’immigration répond exclusivement à des préoccupations municipales ou si des questions nationales jouent aussi un rôle dans ces contextes de nations minoritaires.  Une étudiante graduée travaille présentement sur le projet. David Moffette est particulièrement intéressé à superviser des thèses et mémoires qui portent sur des formes locales de « travail de frontières » dans d’autres villes ou sur des politiques municipales d’immigration à Montréal et Barcelone.

This comparative research project inquires into the logics and practices of institutional actors involved in the control of immigration at the municipal level in Montreal et Barcelona. Officially, the control of borders and immigration is not a municipal responsibility, but we should not conclude from this that municipal actors are not involved in borderwork. This research project 1) documents the enforcement of municipal regulation as a way to target immigrants with precarious status; 2) inquires into the ways in which municipal officials and employees negotiate power and resources to govern immigrants in their jurisdictions, in a context where the federal and provincial governments (for Québec) and the central and autonomous governments (for Catalonia) share most of the power over matters of immigration; and 3) looks at whether municipal immigration governance is strictly informed by municipal concerns, or whether notions of nationhood also come into play in the context of minority nations. The project involves one graduate student at the moment. David Moffette is particularly interested in supervising dissertations, theses and MRPs on local forms of borderwork in other cities or on municipal immigration policies in Montreal or Barcelona.

Professor David Moffette is also involved in other research projects:

  • Lutte contre le trafic de personnes ou criminalisation des réfugiés? Analyse des régimes de justification autour de l’affaire R. c. Appulonappa / Fighting Against Human Smuggling or Criminalization of Refugees? An Analysis of the Regimes of Justification in and around R. v. Appulonappa  (David Moffette). 

Projet en Vedette: Premières Nations, Racisme et (In)justice / Featured Project: First Nations, Racism and (In)justice

Les dates limites pour postuler aux programmes de doctorat (10 janvier) et de maîtrise (15 janvier) offerts par le département de criminologie à l'Université d'Ottawa approchent rapidement. Dans le mois suivant, vous trouverez quelques-uns des nombreux exemples de projet de recherche conduits par les professeurs dans chacun de nos dix champs de recherche. L'édition d'aujourd'hui expose le projet de Baljit Nagra dans le champ de recherche «Premières Nations, Racisme et (In)justice».

The application deadlines for the doctoral (January 10) and master’s programs (January 15) offered by the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa are rapidly approaching.  Over the next month you will find a few of the many examples of research projects being led by professors in each of our ten research fields. Today’s edition showcases a project by Baljit Nagra within the research field of “First Nations, Racism and (In)justice”. 

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First Nations, Racism and (In)justice / Premières Nations, racisme et (in)justice

  • Securitized Citizens: Canadian Muslims Experiences of Counter Terrorism Policies (Baljit Nagra)

Dr. Nagra is currently working on a nationwide qualitative study, consisting of nearly 100 interviews with Canadian Muslim community leaders living in five major Canadian cities (Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Calgary, Vancouver). This study examines the impact of recent changes to citizenship and security laws and policies (i.e. security certificates, passenger protect list, airport/border security, Bill C24, Canadian secret service investigations and visa sponsorship policies) on Muslim communities in Canada. Theoretically, this study explores how racial discourses in state policies and laws reinforce racial hierarchies and social inequalities, altering the meaning of Canadian citizenship and reproducing racialized practices of nation state building in Canada. Ultimately, this research will in specific recommendations on how to improve Canadian state law and policies that disproportionately affect minority communities. This research has been presented at both domestic and international conferences.  A chapter from this research titled ‘National Security: Exclusion and Isolation Among Muslims in Canada’, will be published in the forthcoming edited book collection titled Canada Among Nations on terrorism and counterterrorism, Furthermore, Dr. Nagra is preparing several sole-authored and co-authored papers based on this research that speaks to the changing political landscape in Canada, which includes ideological shifts in citizenship, immigration, refugee settlement, religious freedom and national security.

The Contested Politics of Security: A Triple Book Launch on January 24!

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Wednesday, January 24, 2018, 4 pm to 5:30 pm, uOttawa, FSS 4004
Mercredi, 24 janvier 2018, de 16h à 17h30, uOttawa, FSS 4004

Facebook: www.facebook.com/events/1970687593178949/

Nagra, Baljit. 2017. Securitized Citizens: Canadian Muslims’ Experiences of Race Relations and Identity Formation Post–9/11.
Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Ranasinghe, Prashan. 2017. Helter-Shelter: Security, Legality, and an Ethic of Care in an Emergency Shelter.
Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Moffette, David. 2018. Governing Irregular Migration: Bordering Culture, Labour and Security in Spain.
Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

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The three of us have recently publish books and would like to invite you
to our triple book launch titled "The Contested Politics of Security".

Our books cover a wide range of topics (Muslims' experiences of Canadian security measures, the politics of emergency shelters, and Spanish immigration policy) and yet all engage with the contested politics of security.  They ask: what is security, who are deemed to deserve it, what are the consequences of security measures, and what types of logics and practices inform them

Informal event with brief speeches, books for sale and snacks. Drop by between 4 and 5:30 pm.

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Nous avons tous les trois publié un livre récemment et souhaitons vous inviter
à un triple lancement, intitulé "The Contested Politics of Security".

Nos livres touchent à des sujets divers (l'expérience de musulman.e.s de mesures sécuritaires au Canada, les dynamiques de pouvoir qui opèrent dans des refuges, et les politiques espagnoles d'immigration) mais ils ont en commun d'analyser cette notion contestée qu'est la sécurité.  Ils nous invitent à poser les questions suivantes : qu'est-ce que la sécurité, qui juge-t-on comme méritant de vivre en sécurité, quelles sont les conséquences des mesures de sécurité, et autour de quelles logiques et pratiques s'organisent-elles ?

Événement informel avec brefs discours (surtout en anglais), livres à vendre et grignotines. Passez faire un tour entre 16h et 17h30.

David Moffette, Baljit Nagra and Prashan Ranasinghe

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Octopus Books will also be hosting a launch and talk for Baljit Nagra's book on January 17.

See: http://octopusbooks.ca/event/securitized-citizens-author-baljit-nagra-in-conversation-with-monia-mazigh

Projet en Vedette: Premières Nations, Racisme et (In)justice / Featured Project: First Nations, Racism and (In)justice

Les dates limites pour postuler aux programmes de doctorat (10 janvier) et de maîtrise (15 janvier) offerts par le département de criminologie à l'Université d'Ottawa approchent rapidement. Dans le mois suivant, vous trouverez quelques-uns des nombreux exemples de projet de recherche conduits par les professeurs dans chacun de nos dix champs de recherche. L'édition d'aujourd'hui expose le projet de Sandra Lehalledans le champ de recherche «Premières Nations, racisme et (in)justice».

The application deadlines for the doctoral (January 10) and master’s programs (January 15) offered by the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa are rapidly approaching.  Over the next month you will find a few of the many examples of research projects being led by professors in each of our ten research fields. Today’s edition showcases a project by Sandra Lehalle within the research field of “First Nations, Racism and (In)justice”. 

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First Nations, Racism and (In)justice / Premières Nations, racisme et (in)justice

  • L’internement forcé des « ennemis étrangers »  au Canada durant les deux guerres mondiales (Sandra Lehalle)

Sandra Lehalle travaille sur les justifications morales, politiques et juridiques de la privation de liberté.  Elle développe actuellement un nouveau cadre théorique inspiré du concept d’économie morale de Fassin afin de l’appliquer à diverses formes de détention, notamment les camps d’internement des deux grandes guerres mondiales et les centres de détention d’immigration. A l’été 2016, avec l’aide d’une assistante de recherche, elle a entrepris une première étape de recherche documentaire sur les camps d’internement canadiens. Ce projet est ouvert à l’inclusion de projets de thèses d’étudiants de maîtrise.

Professeur Sandra Lehalle est aussi impliqué dans d'autres recherches:

Projet en Vedette: Prison, Répression et Contrôle Social / Featured Project: Prison, Punishment and Social Control

Les dates limites pour postuler aux programmes de doctorat (10 janvier) et de maîtrise (15 janvier) offerts par le département de criminologie à l'Université d'Ottawa approchent rapidement. Dans le mois suivant, vous trouverez quelques-uns des nombreux exemples de projet de recherche conduits par les professeurs dans chacun de nos dix champs de recherche. L'édition d'aujourd'hui expose le projet de Cheryl Webster dans le champ de recherche «Prison, Répression et Contrôle Social».

The application deadlines for the doctoral (January 10) and master’s programs (January 15) offered by the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa are rapidly approaching.  Over the next month you will find a few of the many examples of research projects being led by professors in each of our ten research fields. Today’s edition showcases a project by Cheryl Webster within the research field of “Prison, Punishment and Social Control”. 

Prison, Punishment and Social Control / Prison, répression et contrôle social

Cheryl Webster is interested in Canadian imprisonment policy.  In collaboration with Anthony Doob (Centre of Criminology and Legal Studies, University of Toronto) their broad research program has been focused on describing and understanding the use of imprisonment in Canada over the past 50 years.  Initial work adopted an inter-national comparative approach in an attempt to explain the anomalous nature of trends in Canadian incarceration rates since 1960 as contrasted with those of the U.S. and England/Wales. While they demonstrate that Canada has not been immune to pressure for harsher criminal justice practices and policies, it has largely been able to counter or balance these trends with other moderating forces. More recent work has adopted an intra-national approach in an attempt to describe and understand trends in imprisonment rates within the country. They have found that the various contributors to our rates of imprisonment show not only considerable diverging patterns but also significant variability across place and time. Further, these various stages in the criminal justice process are shown to have differential effects, depending on the characteristics of the offender or the offence. It is precisely the juxtaposition of this description of Canada’s penal landscape as one of considerable internal instability with that from their prior research of overall or aggregate stability which is their current object of study. Specifically, they have been attempting to go beyond a mere description of the various diverging trends in punishment and explain how they – in combination with each other – produce overall stability through various compensatory systems.

Professor Christine Gervais publishes a new article in Child Abuse & Neglect

Congratulations to the Department of Criminology's Christine Gervais (Associate Professor) and Elisa Romano (Psychology, uOttawa) who have published an article entitled "Safeguarding child rights and enhancing caregiver responsibilities among Canadian parents of youth who sexually offend". The paper appears in the most recent issue of Child Abuse & Neglect

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Abstract:
Research on youth sexual offending has focused primarily on its prevalence. However, recent efforts have begun to consider the collateral consequences for the relatives of offending youth, although little has been done in this regard toward exploring caregiver accountability. This study presents qualitative data on parents’ sense of responsibility in situations where their child engaged in sexual offending behaviour against another child. We analyzed interview data among 16 parents from 10 families in Canada using thematic coding procedures. Findings illustrated the range of responsible actions that caregivers of sexual offending youth undertook with regard to preventing recidivism and accessing appropriate services for all the abuse-affected children. Caregivers reported on the enormous complexities they encountered as they attempted to simultaneously attend to the best interests of both the victim and offending youth. A particularly significant theme was that, despite the overwhelming challenges caregivers faced in dealing with the needs of their offending child, they were also highly attentive to the well-being of the victims. Our findings point to the importance of comprehensive and non-biased support services for both children and caregivers in order to fully uphold the rights of all affected individuals, and to better meet the needs as well as best interests of sexual abuse-affected children.

Projet en Vedette: Prison, Répression et Contrôle Social / Featured Project: Prison, Punishment and Social Control

Les dates limites pour postuler aux programmes de doctorat (10 janvier) et de maîtrise (15 janvier) offerts par le département de criminologie à l'Université d'Ottawa approchent rapidement. Dans le mois suivant, vous trouverez quelques-uns des nombreux exemples de projet de recherche conduits par les professeurs dans chacun de nos dix champs de recherche. L'édition d'aujourd'hui expose le projet de Carolyn Côté-Lussierdans le champ de recherche «Prison, Répression et Contrôle Social».

The application deadlines for the doctoral (January 10) and master’s programs (January 15) offered by the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa are rapidly approaching.  Over the next month you will find a few of the many examples of research projects being led by professors in each of our ten research fields. Today’s edition showcases a project by Carolyn Côté-Lussier within the research field of “Prison, Punishment and Social Control”. 

Prison, Punishment and Social Control / Prison, répression et contrôle social

Increasingly punitive political responses toward crime is suggested by growing prison populations in the U.S. and the UK, and the introduction of harsh penal policies in Canada (e.g., increasing minimum sentences). Yet, the public tends to believe that the courts are not 'harsh' enough in dealing with criminals and that sentences are 'too lenient'. Such public attitudes contribute to the implementation of increasingly harsh criminal justice policies that are socially damaging and economically costly. Punitive attitudes are understood as being reflective of cognitive ‘shortcuts’ or assumptions (e.g., underestimating actual sentencing trends, overestimating crime rates). Still, little is known about intuitive or very rapidly formulated punitive attitudes. Professor Carolyn Côté-Lussier’s research will be the first to identify the role of instantaneous responses in linking social structural factors (e.g., social inequality) and criminal stereotypes to punitive intuitions. It will also make important advancements in terms of establishing the role of intuition in explaining public support for harsh criminal justice policy. The planned studies have received funding from a SSHRC Insight Development grant and will use cutting edge methodologies (e.g., facial electromyography) from the University of Ottawa’s INSPIRE laboratory to detect individuals' rapid intuitive punitive responses. Beginning in Fall 2017, Professor Côté-Lussier will be accepting undergraduate and graduate level research assistants, and graduate level students who wish to work on this project for their thesis.

Projet en Vedette: Prison, Répression et Contrôle Social / Featured Project: Prison, Punishment and Social Control

Les dates limites pour postuler aux programmes de doctorat (10 janvier) et de maîtrise (15 janvier) offerts par le département de criminologie à l'Université d'Ottawa approchent rapidement. Dans le mois suivant, vous trouverez quelques-uns des nombreux exemples de projet de recherche conduits par les professeurs dans chacun de nos dix champs de recherche. L'édition d'aujourd'hui expose le projet de Francoise Vanhamme dans le champ de recherche «Prison, Répression et Contrôle Social».

The application deadlines for the doctoral (January 10) and master’s programs (January 15) offered by the Department of Criminology at the University of Ottawa are rapidly approaching.  Over the next month you will find a few of the many examples of research projects being led by professors in each of our ten research fields. Today’s edition showcases a project by Francoise Vanhamme within the research field of “Prison, Punishment and Social Control”. 

Prison, Punishment and Social Control / Prison, répression et contrôle social

  • Détermination de la sanction dans la pénalité : l’hypothèse d’une socialité vindicatoire dans la vie quotidienne / Determining Sanctions in Penalty, the Hypothesis of a Vindicatory Sociality in Everyday Life (Françoise Vanhamme)

Françoise Vanhamme s'intéresse particulièrement au domaine de la pénologie, c'est-à-dire à la peine, à ses usages, à ses fonctions, aux discours qui les soutiennent. Son principal domaine de recherche est la détermination de la peine comprise dans un sens étroit (les décisions des tribunaux) et dans un sens plus large et macrosocial : la définition en contexte des actes punissables, les justifications du droit de punir en théorie et en pratique, les fonctions de la peine, l'histoire des réformes du sentencing en Occident… Toutefois, pour mieux comprendre les logiques sociales qui entourent les peines pénales, une part de ses recherches porte actuellement, et en collaboration avec Véronique Strimelle, sur les modes et systèmes de réaction et de sanction dans la vie collective et quotidienne, ce qui mène inévitablement à explorer et à systématiser ce qui pose problème aux individus et aux groupes sociaux et à la régulation de ces situations de tort.

Francoise Vanhamme is particularly interested in the field of penology, that is to say penalties, its uses, functions, and the arguments in support of it. Most of her research is in the determination of penalties in a narrow sense (court rulings) and in a larger and macro social sense: the context-specific definition of punishable actions, the legal justification for theoretical and practical punishment, the functions of penalties, the history of reforms in sentencing in the west, and so on. However, in order to better understand the social logic surrounding criminal penalties, part of her research—conducted in collaboration with V. Strimelle—currently covers the reaction and sanction modes and systems in community and day-to-day life, which inevitably leads to the exploration and systematization of things that raise problems for individuals and social groups, as well as the regulation of these problematized situations.